Uses This

Interview

What do people use to get the job done?

Hannah Rothstein

Hannah Rothstein

Conceptual artist

Who are you, and what do you do?

There are some who call me... Tim. Or at least that's what I'd tell you if we were reenacting Monty Python. But since we're not, here's a better answer:

I'm Hannah Rothstein, and I make viral art. That's nothing disease-related, but rather a term I like to use for the genre of work I sense brewing at the intersection of art and the internet. It's encompasses aesthetic creations that are clearly communicated, pop culture savvy, clever, and irresistibly shareable - art that's made for hanging on the pixelated walls of the internet.

My most successful art pieces include Thanksgiving Special, Dr. Dreidel, and Broga (which will be coming out as a book entitled Yoga for Bros this summer!). I also make some fine art, usually in the realm of paintings.

When not making art, I moonlight as a copywriter, rock climber, camper, costume-wearer, hiker, cooperative-house resident, and deliverer of ridiculous karaoke performances.

What hardware do you use?

Most often, I turn to my sketchbook, with pencil, ball point, or micron pens in hand. It's here that I got down silly ideas, themes to follow, concepts to reinvigorate, and good and bad drawings alike. Depending on the project, I also break out my watercolors, acrylics, X-Acto knife, self-healing cutting mat, and rice paste. When working on a photography project, I borrow my lovely sister Tess' Canon Rebel. Someday I might get my own camera, but right now, my head is pretty aligned with the sharing economy.

Alongside conventional art supplies, my work takes me into many odd mediums including dreidels, food, toys, and hama beads.

I also frequently use my computer, a 2013 MacBook Air 13", and surprisingly well made Monoprice graphics tablet. I wish I could spend less time on my technology (sometimes, I feel like I do 90% admin and 10% art), but 'tis necessary and rather useful!

And what software?

My brain. Spending quality time with it, feeding it with inspiration, and letting it noodle over concepts is the foundation of all my work.

But perhaps that's a cop-out answer. Here's more: I use Instagram to share new art and some amusing things I encounter. To keep track of items to accomplish, I loosely use Todoist. Photoshop and Illustrator often come into play for projects I work on. Next up, I'm hoping to learn a little SketchUp.

What would be your dream setup?

Someday, I'd love to have a big, light-soaked, airy studio with cement floors, tall ceilings, enormous windows, and plenty of room to make a mess. The studio would be filled with an astounding array of paints, Prismacolor e-ver-y-thing, drawing utensils, old magazines, luscious art books, shiny bits and bobs, and brushes. I'd have a standing desk for my computer work, and an infinite amount of teas nested next to an electric kettle and array of Heath Ceramics mugs.

I'd also be making 100% of my living with self-initiated art, a mix of conceptual work and painting. Ah, to dream - and damned if I stop trying to make that dream a reality!